Act of Honor: Flags

Taken this past Thursday, in section 30, at Arlington National Cemetery.

Taken this past Thursday, in section 30, at Arlington National Cemetery.

The Cemetery, final resting place for tens-of-thousands who died in service to America, is arresting in its beauty.

Away from the Tomb and the Amphitheater, the tall trees quietly and gracefully cast swaying shadows on markers of memory, an invitation to reflect on unknown acts of valor.

Those valorous acts, from battles past, complete with terror and courage, are memorialized by the fields of stone, each one representing a realized ethic of service.

Soldiers were out, placing an American flag at each stone, a repeated act of honor and remembering.

Arlington offers the willing visitor both the enormity of collective sacrifice and the individual instance of life and death in a tranquility of timelessness and reverence.

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

  • Smitty says:

    Eric,

    When I was little, I lived in a cemetery. My stepfather was a WWII veteran in the British army. One of the most important things we did to take care of the cemetery was to make sure every veteran had a marker on his/her grave, and to put flags in those markers every Memorial Day and Veterans Day. I still remember the markers. They were bronze flag holders, and they had the name of the war in which the vet had fought engraved on the front.

    On Sunday, I was privileged to speak to a group of about 4,500 bikers participating in Rolling Thunder and staging at Patriot Harley in Fairfax. It was a great privilege to speak to them, and to close my speech reminding all in attendance that the democracy for which so many fought and died is not just a good idea -something we sit around and discuss- but an activity that requires our participation. If we truly want to pay tribute to those who lost their lives in the wars, then we are required to learn about issues, study the candidates, and vote in November. Only then are we demonstrating to them that we understand the true nature of their sacrifice.

  • Deltha Cousar-Jeffries says:

    Well said!

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